How has government helped me? In a Nutshell

TheGrandmaster Anti-Libertarian Philosophy, First Line of Defenses, Government is Good

A good bureaucracy is indispensable to a free society, a democratic polity, and a capitalist economy. The freedom to wander the streets at night, for example depends on competent law enforcement. The ability to vote governments out of office without disruption requires a reliable administrative apparatus. A prosperous business community demands good schools, highways, health departments, post offices, and water …

Freedom and Rights are government protected

TheGrandmaster Government is Good

We often make the mistake of seeing our rights and civil liberties as merely the absence of some kind of governmental action. We believe that we have free speech or freedom of religion when the government does nothing to impede those freedoms. But in reality, our rights depend heavily on active government – on positive government actions. In fact, the …

You don’t have the freedom to use your property to harm others

TheGrandmaster Freedom Reclaimed

By granting the exclusive use of property to its owner, this right to acquire and exercise exclusive ownership of property in effect limits and interferes with the freedom of use of all other individuals with respect to that property. If you want freedom, that inherently entails curtailing some freedoms of others. I cannot act recklessly putting others in danger, steal, …

Cost of Rights – Value of Liberty

TheGrandmaster Cost of Rights, First Line of Defenses

Philosophers also distinguish between liberty and the value of liberty. Liberty has little value if those who ostensibly possess it lack the resources to make their rights effective. Freedom to hire a lawyer means little if all lawyers charge fees, if the state will not help, and if you have no money. The right to private property, an important part …

Cost of Rights – Freedom to highest bidder

TheGrandmaster Cost of Rights

The Declaration of Independence states that “to secure these rights, Governments are established among men.” To the obvious truth that rights depend on government must be added a logical corollary, one rich with implications: rights cost money. Rights cannot be protected or enforced without public funding and support. This is just as true of old rights as of new rights, …

Cost of Rights 2 – Liberty presupposes a way to defend it.

TheGrandmaster Cost of Rights

Public support for the kind of “safety net” that benefited the home owners of Westhampton is broad and deep, but at the same time, Americans seem easily to forget that individual rights and freedoms depend fundamentally on vigorous state action. Without effective government, American citizens would not be able to enjoy their private property in the way they do. Indeed, …

Cost of Rights – Rights are Costly

TheGrandmaster Cost of Rights

There is nothing exceptional about this story. In 1996, American taxpayers devoted at least $11.6 billion to protecting private property by means of disaster relief and disaster insurance.2 Every day, every hour, private catastrophes are averted or mitigated by public expenditures that are sometimes large, even massive, but that often go unrecognized. Americans simply assume that our public officials—national, state, …

MTO 7 – Born into a system supported by the public

TheGrandmaster First Line of Defenses, Myth of Ownership

The conventional nature of property is both perfectly obvious and remarkably easy to forget. We are all born into an elaborately structured legal system governing the acquisition, exchange, and transmission of property rights, and ownership comes to seem the most natural thing in the world. But the modern economy in which we earn our salaries, own our homes, bank accounts, …

MTO 6 – Private Property is legal convention.

TheGrandmaster First Line of Defenses, Myth of Ownership

Private property is a legal convention, defined in part by the tax system; therefore, the tax system cannot be evaluated by looking at its impact on private property, conceived as something that has independent existence and validity. Taxes must be evaluated as part of the overall system of property rights that they help to create. Justice or injustice in taxation …

Murray Rothbard and the Psychopathic reality behind the curtain

TheGrandmaster Anti-Libertarian Philosophy, People's writings

Libertarians on starving your child, deformed or not, to death: “The parent therefore may not murder or mutilate his child, and the law properly outlaws a parent from doing so. But the parent should have the legal right not to feed the child, i.e., to allow it to die.[4] The law, therefore, may not properly compel the parent to feed …

Private Property – In the real world, things belong to people who have the power to take them.

TheGrandmaster Anti-Libertarian Philosophy, First Line of Defenses

Isn’t all property private? No. In the real world, things belong to people who have the power to take them, unless there is a power that guarantees other people won’t take them. And so usually, private property depends on the existence of government power, that is to say, a power that is able to protect private property from those who …

Protection antecedent to Wealth

TheGrandmaster Anti-Libertarian Philosophy, The Fine Print

Wealth could not be created and maintained without laws that defined property and other rights, the presence of courts to adjudicate disputes, the power to enforce court decisions and a military to protect riches from marauders. All this in turn depended on having a means to pay for it— taxes. Perfect rebuttal, once and for all, to the idea that …

TheGrandmaster Cost of Rights, First Line of Defenses

An effective liberal government, designed to repress force and fraud, must avoid arbitrary and authoritarian tactics . Those who wield the tools of coercion must be institutionally disciplined into using it for public, not private, purposes. Ideally conceived, a liberal government extracts resources from society fairly and efficiently and redeploys them skillfully and responsibly to produce socially useful public goods …

TheGrandmaster Cost of Rights

None of this denies that protection of property rights can be a valuable investment that increases aggregate wealth over time. On the contrary, the extraction and redistribution of resources necessary to protect property rights is relatively easy to justify . Indeed, American liberalism, like its counterparts elsewhere in the world, is based on the reasonable premise that public investment in …

TheGrandmaster Cost of Rights

ACCORDING TO THE BRITISH PHILOSOPHER JEREMY BENTHAM, “property and law are born together and die together. Before the laws there was no property; take away the laws, all property ceases.” 1 Every first-year law student learns that private property is not an “object” or a “thing” but a complex bundle of rights. Property is a legally constructed social relation, a …

TheGrandmaster Anti-Libertarianism: Markets Philosophy and Myth

I have an object if I have just stolen it from you and am now refusing to give it back. (Anti-Libertarianism, Location 185) Perfect Sawyer example. Possession does not tell us everything, most or perhaps even anything about ownership. Ownership is a complex nexus of social conventions from custodianship, perception, law, enforcement, and philosophy. In a world with no Government, …

TheGrandmaster Anti-Libertarianism: Markets Philosophy and Myth

I have some spare A and you have some extra B; whereas, in the others, it is assumed, if not stated, both that the parties are the rightful owners of the things (objects or services) they exchange and that they own those things as private property (which, for libertarians, comes to the same thing of course). (Anti-Libertarianism, Location 182) Property …